University of Kent
  • Research

    The School has a strong research culture and an international reputation in a number of fields.
  • Centres and groups

    We have two research centres that specialise in macroeconomics and agri-environmental studies, plus an active microeconomics research group.
  • Seminars

    We host weekly research seminars by visiting visiting academics from universities and institutions in the UK and abroad.
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Dr Adelina Gschwandtnerby Adelina Gschwandtner, University of Kent; Cheul Jang, Korea Water; and Richard McManus, Canterbury Christ Church University. Discussion paper KDPE 1720, December 2017.

Non-technical summary:

South Korea is a country with a historically polluted water supply. Water pollution has spread according to economic development worldwide. Increased discharges of untreated sewage combined with agricultural runoff and inadequately treated wastewater from industry, have resulted in the severe degradation of water quality all over the world; however, the situation appears to be especially worrying in South Korea. Several accidents of contamination in the water such as detection of trihalomethanes, heavy metal, harmful pesticides and disease germs in tap water, have made the average Korean concerned about the safety of the water supply, and very few citizens drink water directly from the tap.

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Dr Alfred Duncanby Alfred Duncan, University of Kent and Charles Nolan, University of Glasgow, discussion paper KDPE 1719, December 2017.

Non-technical summary:

In recent decades, macroeconomic researchers have looked to incorporate financial intermediaries explicitly in business cycle models. These modelling developments have helped us to understand the role of the financial sector in the transmission of policy and external shocks into macroeconomic dynamics. They have also helped us to better understand the consequences of financial instability for the macroeconomy.

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Professor Nizar Allouchby Nizar Allouch, discussion paper KDPE 1718, December 2017.

Non-technical summary:

Understanding, and making sense of, large economic networks is an increasingly important problem from an economic perspective, due to the ever-widening gap between technological advances in constructing such networks, and our ability to predict and estimate their properties. Throughout history, various concepts have been developed to reduce the inherent complexity found in large economic systems, thereby rendering them more amenable to economic analysis.

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Keynes CollegeA paper by Miguel Leon-Ledesma and Mathan Satchi entitled ‘Appropriate technology and balanced growth’ has been accepted for publication at the Review of Economic Studies, one of the leading journals in Economics. A non-technical summary of the paper, previously published in the school’s Discussion Paper series, can be found here.