University of Kent
  • Research

    The School has a strong research culture and an international reputation in a number of fields.
  • Centres and groups

    We have two research centres that specialise in macroeconomics and agri-environmental studies, plus an active microeconomics research group.
  • Seminars

    We host weekly research seminars by visiting visiting academics from universities and institutions in the UK and abroad.
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alex klein 120x120A new discussion paper by Alexander Klein and Jelle van Lottum, KDPE 1710, June 2017.

Non-technical summary

Migration was a common feature of pre-industrial societies. Because the vast majority of migrations took place within the confines of a country, a province or even a parish, in most cases such moves occurred over relatively short distances. However, long-distance migrations, involving moves of hundreds of kilometres or more, often of individuals entering foreign territories, were hardly rare (Page Moch 2003; Manning 2005; Van Lottum 2007; Bade et al. 2013). Recent estimates show that international mobility levels increased strongly after the medieval period, peaking in the late seventeenth century.

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miguel leon ledesma 120x120A new discussion paper by Adina Ardelean, Miguel León-Ledesma and Laura Puzzello, KDPE 1709, June 2017.

Non-technical summary

In modern theories of economic fluctuations, shocks that drive macroeconomic uncertainty are transformed into business cycles through a propagation mechanism. One such propagation mechanism can be inter-industry linkages: volatility at the industry level can translate into aggregate macroeconomic volatility. For this reason, understanding the sources of risk at the industry level is important. This is even more important in open economies, where industries are exposed to shocks arising in industries located in other countries.

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alex klein 120x120A new discussion paper by Tamás Vonyó and Alexander Klein, KDPE 1708, April 2017.

Non-technical summary

The role of institutions features prominently in comparative studies of economic development. Eastern Europe after 1945 provides a textbook case, where relative decline in income per head and productivity has been linked to institutional failure. The inefficiency of central planning compared to the market economy is well established both theoretically and empirically. The socialist system, it has been argued, was relatively successful in mobilizing resources but stifled innovation and entrepreneurship. Planned economies thus achieved ‘a satisfactory productivity performance in the era of mass production, but could not adapt to the requirements of flexible production technology’ (Broadberry and Klein 2011, p. 37).

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keynes collegeA new discussion paper by Raquel Campos, Fernanda L. L. de Leon and Ben McQuillin, KDPE 1707, April 2017.

Non-technical summary

When an academic participates in a large conference, her likelihood of subsequently writing a paper with at least one participant at the conference increases by one-sixth (close to 18%). Moreover, it seems that conferences improve the quality of matching among co-authors, leading to papers that are published in higher-ranked journals.

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